Research on Science, Technology and Culture. Shifting Opinions, Shifting Policy, Shifting Society.
American University Students Analyze Communication, Culture and the Environment

American University Students Analyze Communication, Culture and the Environment

Spring 2014 course prepares students to engage society on climate change and other environmental problems.
Latest entries

COM 589: Third Short Analysis Paper on Journalism in the New Media Ecosystem and Communication Strategies to Promote Localized Engagement

The following is the third short paper topic for the course COM 589: Communication, Culture and the Environment. Choose 1 of the following 2 questions to answer based on readings and class discussion for April 7 / April 14 & 21 The paper is due by email on Thursday May 1 by 3pm EST.  Send to...

COM 589: Second Analysis Paper on Cultural Disagreement Over Climate Change, Technology and New Directions for Environmentalism

The following is the second short paper topic for the course COM 589: Communication, Culture and the Environment. Choose 1 of the following 2 questions to answer based on readings and class discussion for Feb. 10 & 17 / March 24 & 31. The paper is due in class on Mon. April 7. 1) Over...

University of British Columbia “Sharing Science” Conference: Twenty Years of Evolving Models of Science Communication

Carl Sagan and Neil deGrasse Tyson have come to symbolize the dominant “popularization” approach to science communication, a model that has been embraced with renewed enthusiasm among young scientists as they have experimented with and developed a variety of digital and social media tools. Yet this dominant approach to science communication is not without several...

Journalist’s Resource @ Harvard University On the Interplay of Partisanship & Beliefs About Science

Journalist’s Resource at Harvard University is an outstanding resource for scholars, journalists and students seeking authoritative backgrounders and discussion of policy-relevant relevant studies in the sciences and social sciences. Below is the text of their backgrounder on our February 18 study published at the journal PLOS ONE. At the page, you can also click on...

The Public Square: In Our Biopolitics Future, Public Debates Will Blur Left/Right Differences

–Reposted from The Public Square blog at The Breakthrough, appearing Feb. 18, 2014. If you follow the rapid pace of advances in biomedicine and the life sciences, you may have wondered why more politically liberal countries like Germany and Canada have stronger restrictions on embryonic stem cell research than the more politically conservative United States. To...

The Conversation UK: Opinions About Scientific Advances Blur Party/Political Lines

–Reposted from commentary appearing at The Conversation UK on February 18, 2014. Matthew Nisbet & Ezra Markowitz Reading about the rapid pace of advances in biomedicine, you may have wondered why more politically liberal countries like Germany and Canada have stronger restrictions on embryonic stem cell research than the politically conservative US. History and happenstance...

The Scientist Magazine: Beyond Partisanship in Biopolitics

–Reposted commentary appearing at The Scientist Magazine on Feb. 18, 2014. Matthew C. Nisbet & Ezra M. Markowitz During the next decade, advances in the life sciences are likely to generate intense political debate in the United States and around the world. Even as conflict over human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research has largely subsided,...

PLOS ONE Study Suggests Need to Engage Public on Core Beliefs about Science and Society

In a study published today at PLOS ONE, my co-author Ezra Markowitz and I analyze the factors that influenced U.S. public opinion across elections and legislative battles over embryonic stem cell research. Not surprisingly, partisanship, ideology and religion played a role, but our analysis of nationally representative survey data collected between 2002 and 2010 suggests that...

Upcoming American University Research Seminars Analyze the Media, Ideology and Climate Politics

The Roots of Ideologically-Driven Denialism and its Consequences for Institutional Confidence in Science Erik C Nisbet, Ph.D. The Ohio State University Thurs. Feb. 20 1:15-3pm EST McKinley T-10 A perceived rise in ideologically-motivated scientific denialism within the Republican Party has led some scholars and pundits to argue that conservatives have become inherently anti-science and are in...

COM 589: First Analysis Paper on Scientists As Advocates / Models of Science Communication

The following is the first short paper topic for the course COM 589: Communication, Culture and the Environment.  Choose 1 of the following 2 questions to answer. The paper is due in class on Mon. February 17. 1) As environmental groups and activists work to promote action on climate change and other environmental problems, scientists...