Research on Science, Technology and Culture. Shifting Opinions, Shifting Policy, Shifting Society.
Posts tagged "Matthew Nisbet"

The Polarization Paradox: Why Hyperpartisanship Strengthens Conservatism and Undermines Liberalism

  Modern campaigns have rarely focused on the issues, but in the 2012 election the level of moral outrage and anger is unprecedented.  Even before the campaign, America was divided, but come next year, if President Obama is re-elected he will likely face a country more polarized than at any time in more than a...

We Are All Climate-Change Idiots: New York Times’ “Week in Review” Spotlights Work of the Climate Shift Project

On Sunday, in an article titled “We Are All Climate-Change Idiots,” New York Times “Week in Review” contributor Beth Gardiner discussed the research of social scientists studying public judgments, decisions, and communication about climate change.  Among research noted, was work that I have done in collaboration with Ed Maibach, Tony Leiserowitz, and others on communicating...

More on the Shifting Roles of Science Journalists in the Digital Age

Following up on our study analyzing the shifting roles and emerging practices of science journalists, Declan Fahy contributed a valuable discussion to the news site of the British Association of Science Writers.  Lede below. Also see Fahy’s article at CJR.org and a more detailed discussion with PDF of the study. Now that science reporters have...

Study Maps the Relationship Between Cable News and Climate Change Perceptions

A new study finds that Fox News tends to feature guests who doubt the reality of climate change and stories that dismiss the need for action, while CNN and MSNBC tend to feature guests who assert the reality of climate change and the need for action.  Interestingly, however, Fox tends to devote more attention to...

How Scientists View the Public, the Media, and the Political Process

Most scientists in the US and UK blame public ignorance of science for flawed policy preferences and political choices. They tend to be critical of media coverage, yet rate favorably their own experience with the media.  Scientists say policy-makers and journalists are the most important groups to engage and view the public as having secondary...